Key research findings

Research included on site and online surveys, demographic analysis as well as workshops with stakeholders and community members.  Read the full background research report for more information.

Place based findings

"There is an expressed willingness among residents to walk or ride more often in the GreenWay catchment, providing safe routes are made available."
  • The GreenWay is a significant open space asset for Inner Sydney and will be the first GreenWay for Sydney.
  • The GreenWay connects to several existing and proposed bicycle and pedestrian paths and forms part of the Sydney Green Link. It follows the alignment of the future light rail extension.
  • The GreenWay has been a primary proposed active travel route of various State and Local Government plans in recent years.
  • The GreenWay is a significant biodiversity resource and provides a green urban corridor for habitat protection and regrowth.
  • There is high community stewardship and involvement in the GreenWay due to the large number and variety of community groups and activities already operating and investing in the development, promotion and maintenance of the GreenWay.
  • The former rail freight line is a barrier dividing east and west - the GreenWay will provide more crossings at light rail stations.
  • Existing open spaces are used predominantly by locals.
  • The Hawthorne Canal Dog Park is the key regional attractor, with other parks being used primarily by locals walking to them.
  • The existing shared path is currently fragmented at road and rail crossings and around street detours.
  • There are many special places within the GreenWay that are cherished by the community that include Hawthorne Canal Reserve, Hawthorne Canal Dog Park, Johnston Park, Cafe Bones, Cooks River, Cooks River cycleway, Richard Murden Reserve, the connection to Iron Cove, the green space between Parramatta Road and Marion Street and the reserve near the historic train bridge.
  • There are over 23 schools within 400 metres of the GreenWay.
  • There are strong cultural and historic elements within and around the GreenWay.

Community findings

"People want to reduce the number of cars on the road and limit the impact of transport on the environment."
  • Stable community, with many long term, loyal residents.
  • Predominantly Generation X (34 - 49 years old).
  • Baby boom of under 5 year olds as Generation X start to have kids.
  • High proportion of couples without children, when compared to metropolitan Sydney
  • Generally a prosperous community.
  • High proportions are working, predominantly in professional or managerial jobs.
  • Highly educated.
  • Environmentally minded.
  • Creative and trend setters, interested in their local community.
  • Invested in causes through financial contributions more often than time.
  • People want open space to be communal and open to impromptu uses and activities for all people and ages.
  • The people are self-motivated, active, enthusiastic, creative and community minded.
  • People want to reduce the number of cars on the road and limit the impact of transport on the environment.
  • People aspire to rely less on the car, however they live busy lives where efficiency and perceived safety are paramount.

Active transport findings

"People want to reduce the number of cars on the road and limit the impact of transport on the environment. These shared sentiments indicate a willing audience that is ready to utilise the GreenWay as an active transport corridor immediately upon opening."
  • There is an opportunity for the GreenWay to provide an Active Transport route that links a large population to schools, employment and recreation.
  • There is traffic congestion in streets around the GreenWay – particularly related to school drop off and pick ups.
  • Car use is dominant, particularly for non-commuter trips.
  • People want to walk or ride safely – however current traffic and cycle paths pose a constraint.
  • Women drive more than men, often as they are dropping children off at school and performing errands and shopping tasks along with child rearing, part time or full time employment (50.5% women drive to work, compared with 32.6% of men).
  • Cycling for transport is more common for men (32.6%) for commuting trips and (31.5%) for non commuting trips. Only 10.9% of women cycle to work and 14.9% cycle for non-work related trips.
  • Walkers are predominantly women, 18.8% of women walk to work, whilst only 5.5% of men walk. 30.7% of women walk for noncommuting trips whilst only 16.9% of men walk.
  • Schools with concerted active travel initiatives experience high levels of active travel (57% at Kegworth Public School).

A large majority (67.6%) of respondents cited ‘local and convenient’ as reasons for using open space. A similarly large majority (65.2%) cited their favourite thing about the GreenWay and surrounding parks as ‘paths for walking and cycling’. These significantly large shared sentiments indicate a willing audience that is ready to utilise the GreenWay as an active transport corridor immediately upon opening.

This is providing it is perceived as convenient and accessible.  This willingness has clear benefits in conjunction with the light rail extension. If it is perceived as easy and convenient to access the light rail by bicycle or foot the light rail will enjoy high usage from an increased catchment. Similarly, passengers using the light rail will need to enter and at times move along the GreenWay, increasing its activity and utilisation.